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  1. #21
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    Default Re: 12 weeks, bright and going to be big - what to teach her?

    socialisation socialisation socialisation.
    You've only got a few weeks of that optimum time left so id make the most of it.

    Shes a mix of two large breed's, one a hunting/gaurding type and the other famed for guarding ability and banned/on dangerous dog lists across the world. Both beautiful..but not for the faint hearted.

    I would be very much trying to combat the natural aloofness and potential guarding issues with a massive amount of socialisation at a young age to help her be more accepting with strangers when she's hitting maturity ( though if you have a rotty you will be better prepared then most) If you were at our vet practice we would encourage you to bring her in as often as possible for desensitisation and treats in the quiet times of day so she thinks yeah food and fun place.... not that horrible building where they manhandle thermometer and needle me.

    If you want her to be good with kids start introducing her to their sounds erraticness etc now- training or even sitting near playgrounds are good for this if your in a built up area. little people in the family are also very helpful.

    otherwise the basics for any large dog. all feet on the floor to greet people, a watch me command is always helpful to refocus them.as is a solid leave it/drop it....drop down..ie a down when loose, is really helpful as well but a bit tricky to teach until they are good at recall.heel.

    Learning to be alone and be secure in that is something every dog should learn imo.

    basic handling of feet,teeth, ears,eyes tail etc.... by "strangers" as well as you....most dogs will tolerate their owners handling them but its strangers manhandling they are scared of/take offence to, would also be helpful.

    I'm a massive fan of crate and muzzle training as well,as being familiar with both those things make vet visits significantly less stressful if confinement or a muzzle is ever required but thats probably overkill for young pup just yet...

    But above all else at this age id want a pup out and about- carry her if she's not finished the vac course, having as any new and positive experiences with people as I could. The early socialisation window is pretty narrow and it does make a difference.

  2. #22
    Schoolmaster
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    Nov 2008
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    Default Re: 12 weeks, bright and going to be big - what to teach her?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aru View Post
    Shes a mix of two large breed's, one a hunting/gaurding type and the other famed for guarding ability and banned/on dangerous dog lists across the world. Both beautiful..but not for the faint hearted.
    Actually, thinking this through, this probably isn't a dog I'd be happy to meet off-lead in public. Not with a child & small dog in-tow. So, lots of training building to something that will keep her occupied on-lead. Maybe the scent work idea (although don't think either breed is known to be good at that, they presumably are both bred more for tearing to bits things they can actually see?) Was this a deliberate mating if you don't mind me asking OP? And will you also be using her for guarding or something? Doesn't sound like it and you sound like a very responsible owner but, having recently paid the price (financial and emotional) of meeting a breeding male of one of these breeds off-lead (mine was on-lead) I would now actively leave a park with one in unless it was on (substantial) lead. Simply too much risk that one bite means curtains for my small fluffy one.

  3. #23
    Old nag equi's Avatar
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    Default Re: 12 weeks, bright and going to be big - what to teach her?

    Shes adorable. But i agree she will be a breed type most will "run" from, so you need to prepare yourself for that. I think a lot of the problems with dogs of certain breeds comes from people not using that trait...for example city folk having a collie and then not being able to control them chasing cars.

    Prepare for her to guard the house, but correct her for guarding people or certain things...(toys, bowls etc) and as said get her out as much as possible.

    I have to admit i agree with GF id be a bit weary with her off lead, even well trained, as there is only so much training can do. Traits are traits for a reason...

  4. #24

    Default Re: 12 weeks, bright and going to be big - what to teach her?

    would just like to add that imo all dogs are `bright`

  5. #25

    Default Re: 12 weeks, bright and going to be big - what to teach her?

    We wanted another large dog, a mastiff type, but going for a cross breed that would give us a lighter weight and healthier version. Many huge breeds don't live all that long, unfortunately.
    We are fortunate enough to live away from other people. I won't say it's a bad thing to have a big dog with you when you're going out at 2am to investigate a noise, but she's certainly not a guard dog. If she learns manners from the rottie, I will be delighted, as she has the best temperament of any dog I have ever met, but I'm not taking it for granted, hence the socialization, training and exposure as early as possible, and seeking further ideas from you guys!

    So far, so good - she's lovely; a pleasure inside the house and out. She has started playing football with the rottie

  6. #26
    Just passing through... MrsMozart's Avatar
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    Default Re: 12 weeks, bright and going to be big - what to teach her?

    'Stay', especially combined with 'Down'.

    It was a vry useful one for my GSDxRottie as I could have him drop down and stay down from the other side of a playing field.

    "One life - live it"

  7. #27

    Default Re: 12 weeks, bright and going to be big - what to teach her?

    Quote Originally Posted by MrsMozart View Post
    'Stay', especially combined with 'Down'.

    It was a vry useful one for my GSDxRottie as I could have him drop down and stay down from the other side of a playing field.
    I use an arm upright signal for 'sit' with my setter (who doesn't do 'close control') - do you use something similar for 'down', that they can see even if they can't hear you?

    Also, for distance (again, with the setter - rottie never goes that far, although she does know the commands), I use a whistle - 3 quick pips is come, one long is sit/stay. Do you use a whistle, or rely on voice?

  8. #28
    Just passing through... MrsMozart's Avatar
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    Default Re: 12 weeks, bright and going to be big - what to teach her?

    It's about twenty years ago and I can't really remember... I have a very travelling voice and he always had me in his sight/hearing. I probably used a full arm downward motion as well as the voice. Tried a whistle but he didn't like it.

    Have a GSD now but she won't go far enough from me to be an issue.

    "One life - live it"

  9. #29
    En route to the kennels.
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    Default Re: 12 weeks, bright and going to be big - what to teach her?

    I'm really sorry to say this pennyturner, but I do wonder, if in time you too may wonder just why you bought a cross-breed from two separate breeds, both of which are known to be difficult, the C_C particularly so. The Ridgeback as a breed is often described as being 'reserved'. The dog's 'reservations' can often translate as being nervous and when put to a dog, the C_C which can be particularly aggressive, it would be highly unlikely that a balanced temperament would be the result. Those who produce these designer breeds do so because they seem to have a ready market for the pups, and why, is beyond me.

    I'm genuinely sorry to make such negative and damning comments, but feel that it will serve you better than a load of pointless oohing and aahing! It may well be that your pup goes against the flow and proves to be an excellent and well adjusted dog and no one will be more pleased than I to be wrong.

    The only, or at least the most useful advice that I can give you is that (and though I'd normally be opposed to this) you start as you mean to go on. When your pup goes past her teens and should she prove to be a little more self-willed and determined than you'd hoped for, (read stubborn) and particularly should she show signs of aggression towards anything two legged or four, that you concentrate on the problems and make her face them under your terms.

    Again, I will be delighted to be wrong, and I only hope that I am.

    Alec.
    I've decided that life's far to important for it to be taken seriously.

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